MovieScore Media: "The Prosecutors" music by Miguel d'Oliveira


MovieScore Media once again teams up with Miguel d’Oliveira, one of the most in-demand composers of the British television documentary scene. Following up releases like Joanna Lumley’s Trans-Siberian Adventure (2015) and Michael Palin in North Korea (2018) where Miguel had to underscore unique foreign cultures, his latest score for The Prosecutors finally takes him back to his native Britain. The three-part series is documenting the work of the Crown Prosecution Service, following a number of cases over an 18-month period and focusing on three different parts of the process: The Charge, The Proof and finally the Trial.

“The Prosecutors was an interesting and challenging canvas to write for” explains the composer about the trials around his score. “The network wanted a big-drama-series kind of soundtrack but me and the directors were constantly trying to root everything on the fact that these were real life stories. I hope I was able to give it a strong body and all the gear changes. Always with an eye on the scale. You push it too far and the whole thing gets derailed.” The unique blend of high-scale drama and human interest stories results in a mesmerizing drama score that captures the very essence of sin, guilt and innocence as each of the cases get resolved by the end of their respective episode.

Following his graduation from medical school, composer Miguel d’Oliveira taught himself music and became a multi-instrumentalist playing in several ethnic and jazz bands as well as symphonic orchestras. After scoring his first short for a film school graduate, he completed an MA in Composition for Film at the National Film and Television School. The composer’s credits include the hit series First Dates (2013), the BBC documentaries The Battle of Britain (2010), The Last Miners (2016) and Louis Theroux: Altered States (2018), the HBO documentary Diana, Our Mother: Her Life and Legacy (2017), Joanna Lumley’s Trans-Siberian Adventure (2015) and Michael Palin in North Korea (2018). Each of these scores highlight the composer’s unique ability in melding ethnic elements with a symphonic sound
 
On the link below, you can view a video, featuring a suite from the score: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAb00UZkko4
 
Jeremy [Six Strings]

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