Kino Classics: "THE HALF-BREED/THE GOOD BAD MAN" (1916) [BLU-RAY or DVD]


Kino Classics is proud to announce that two long-unseen early Douglas Fairbanks silent films, The Half-Breed and The Good Bad Man, are coming to Blu-ray and DVD on May 1.

Released in 1916, The Half-Breed represents Fairbanks' first effort at a serious acting role, a departure from the kind of light comedy that had made him a star on the stage and in his earliest film appearances. Also from 1916, The Good Bad Man is Fairbanks' first Western, and gives him one of his best roles of this early period of his career. Both films were directed by early Hollywood pioneer Allan Dwan, who later directed Fairbanks in such classics of the silent era as Robin Hood (1922) and The Iron Mask (1929).

Set to become available on Blu-ray and DVD May 1, this edition from Kino Classics contains special features including Amazing Tales From the Archives: Restoring The Half-Breed, audio commentaries on both films by film historian Tracey Goessel (author of The First King of Hollywood: The Life of Douglas Fairbanks) and film restorer Robert Byrne; and a photo gallery. Music scores for both films are composed and performed by Donald Sosin.


In an attempt to brand himself as a serious actor, the smiling swashbuckler Douglas Fairbanks starred in The Half-Breed (1916), a Western melodrama written by Anita Loos and directed with flair by Allan Dwan. Fairbanks stars as Lo Dorman, who has been ostracized from society because of his mixed ethnicity - his Native American mother was abandoned by his white father. When Lo catches the eye of the rich white debutante Nellie (Jewel Carmen), he becomes a target for the racist Sheriff Dunn (Sam De Grasse), who wants to break them up and take Nellie for his own. This love triangle becomes a quadrangle with the arrival of Teresa (Alma Rubens), who is on the run from the law. Through fire and fury Lo must decide who and what he truly loves.
 
What's important about this films, the year released and the release on a new digital format... this is film's history not lost.
Jeremy [Six Strings]

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